The Kathy Bernie Chronicles

Kate - the land of Oz - grey owls - blue skies - climbing trees - natural history - far away places - camomile tea - 1950s musicals - healthy living

hillcrash:

From “Journal Of The Horticultural Society Of London”, 1873.

hillcrash:

From “Journal Of The Horticultural Society Of London”, 1873.

(via scientificillustration)

lohrien:

Illustrations by Gabriel Iumazark 

zethie:

lordofvermin:

Inkweeds.

that some studio ghibli shit right there.

zethie:

lordofvermin:

Inkweeds.

that some studio ghibli shit right there.

(via regiiina-phalange)

teaganwhite:

a quick process gif showing my digital coloring process step-by-step, from scanned pencil drawing to full-color final art

teaganwhite:

a quick process gif showing my digital coloring process step-by-step, from scanned pencil drawing to full-color final art

noelbadgespugh:

expansion

noelbadgespugh:

expansion

astronomy-to-zoology:

Greater Sooty Owl (Tyto tenebricosa)
…is a species of barn owl (Tytonidae) that is native to south-eastern Australia, New Guinea and Flinder’s Island in the Bass Strait. Like other barn owls T. tenebricosa are nocturnal and inhabit moist forests where smooth-barked gum trees are present, along with ferns and a wet under-story. Greater Sooty Owls feed mainly on large arboreal marsupials like greater gliders, but will take birds, bats, and large insects as well. 
Classification
Animalia-Chordata-Aves-Strigiformes-Tytonidae-Tyto-T. tenebricosa
Image: Quollism

astronomy-to-zoology:

Greater Sooty Owl (Tyto tenebricosa)

…is a species of barn owl (Tytonidae) that is native to south-eastern Australia, New Guinea and Flinder’s Island in the Bass Strait. Like other barn owls T. tenebricosa are nocturnal and inhabit moist forests where smooth-barked gum trees are present, along with ferns and a wet under-story. Greater Sooty Owls feed mainly on large arboreal marsupials like greater gliders, but will take birds, bats, and large insects as well. 

Classification

Animalia-Chordata-Aves-Strigiformes-Tytonidae-Tyto-T. tenebricosa

Image: Quollism

(via tiffanybozic)

birdoftheday:

In this lithograph print, German Biologist Ernst Haeckel depicts twelve species of hummingbirds. The only place where you can find all 328 species in the wild is the Americas. The taxonomic order bestowed upon the hummers by Linnaeus is a culmination of quaint myths that tie the hummer together with geographically estranged birds: the Egyptian plover and the wren. In the past, these two birds were thought to live life on the edge as crocodile teeth-cleaners - the myth of plover-crocodile symbiosis pervades today. When Europeans heard of the mystical hummers of the New World, an account emerged of the hummer joining the wren and the plover in this thrill-seeking employment. Ingellson then tops this lasagna of myths with a fine layer of cheese: hummingbirds were placed in the order Trochilidae, after Trochilus, the ancient Greek word for plover.
(1) print: Ernst Haeckel’s 1899 collection Art Forms of Nature, Wikipedia Commons(2) Ernest Ingersoll, Birds in Legend, Fables & Folklore (pre-1923)

birdoftheday:

In this lithograph print, German Biologist Ernst Haeckel depicts twelve species of hummingbirds. The only place where you can find all 328 species in the wild is the Americas. The taxonomic order bestowed upon the hummers by Linnaeus is a culmination of quaint myths that tie the hummer together with geographically estranged birds: the Egyptian plover and the wren. In the past, these two birds were thought to live life on the edge as crocodile teeth-cleaners - the myth of plover-crocodile symbiosis pervades today. When Europeans heard of the mystical hummers of the New World, an account emerged of the hummer joining the wren and the plover in this thrill-seeking employment. Ingellson then tops this lasagna of myths with a fine layer of cheese: hummingbirds were placed in the order Trochilidae, after Trochilus, the ancient Greek word for plover.

(1) print: Ernst Haeckel’s 1899 collection Art Forms of Nature, Wikipedia Commons
(2) Ernest Ingersoll, Birds in Legend, Fables & Folklore (pre-1923)

(via scientificillustration)